Altered Regional Brain Cortical Thickness in Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Changes in cortical thickness are present in children with OSA and likely indicate disruption to neural developmental processes, including maturational patterns of cortical volume increases and synaptic pruning. Regions with thicker cortices may reflect inflammation or astrocyte activation. Both the thinning and thickening associated with OSA in children may contribute to the cognitive and behavioral dysfunction frequently found in the condition.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29403430

Daytime variation of perioperative myocardial injury in cardiac surgery and its prevention by Rev-Erbα antagonism: a single-centre propensity-matched cohort study and a randomised study

Perioperative myocardial injury is transcriptionally orchestrated by the circadian clock in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement, and Rev-Erbα antagonism seems to be a pharmacological strategy for cardioprotection. Afternoon surgery might provide perioperative myocardial protection and lead to improved patient outcomes compared with morning surgery.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29107324

Altered resting-state hippocampal and caudate functional networks in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

The compromised hippocampal-cortical functional connectivity in OSA may underlie depression and anxious mood levels in OSA, while impaired caudate-cortical FC may indicate deficits in reward processing and cognition. These findings provide insights into the neural mechanisms underlying the comorbidity of mood and cognitive deficits in OSA.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29749715